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Teaching the Bible through Popular Culture and the Arts
Mark Roncace, Patrick Gray
ISBN
9781589832442
Volume
RBS 53
Status
Available
Price
$40.00
Publication Date
November 2007
Paperback

$40.00

This resource enables biblical studies instructors to facilitate engaging classroom experiences by drawing on the arts and popular culture. It offers brief overviews of hundreds of easily accessible examples of art, film, literature, music, and other media and outlines strategies for incorporating them effectively and concisely in the classroom. Although designed primarily for college and seminary courses on the Bible, the ideas can easily be adapted for classes such as “Theology and Literature” or “Religion and Art” as well as for nonacademic settings. This compilation is an invaluable resource for anyone who teaches the Bible.

Mark Roncace is Assistant Professor of Religion at Wingate University in Wingate, North Carolina, and author of Jeremiah, Zedekiah, and the Fall of Jerusalem (T&T Clark). Patrick Gray is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, and author of Godly Fear: The Epistle to the Hebrews and Greco-Roman Critiques of Superstition (Society of Biblical Literature). They are the editors of Teaching the Bible: Practical Strategies for Classroom Instruction (Society of Biblical Literature).

“Brimming with ideas, this book can offer helpful assistance when considering how biblical themes and historical issues might be easily amplified through comparison with the artistic media and expressions of popular culture. … The contents of the book succeed in stimulating the reader to think about pedagogy in courses on the Bible in ever-more creative ways. Don’t let students read this book, or they’ll start to expect much more of their instructors!”
— Bruce Longenecker, Journal for the Study of the New Testament

“Overall, the editors are to be congratulated not only for an invaluable resource, but also for making a powerful cumulative argument for the ongoing significance of the Bible in Western culture.”
— P. P. Jenson, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament